Programming

A 8-post collection

Fix for the Psy-Q Saturn SDK

If you ever want to write code for the Sega Saturn using the Psy-Q SDK (available here), you may encounter a small problem with the toolset when using #include directives.

Example:

#include "abc.h"

int main()
{
    int b = a + 43;
    return 0;
}
main.c
C:\Psyq\bin>ccsh -ITHING/ -S main.c
build.bat
int a = 98;
abc.h

This will crash with the following error: main.c:1: abc.h: No such file or directory, which is quite strange given that we explicitely told the compiler to look in that THING folder.

What we have:

  • CCSH.EXE : main compiler executable (C Compiler Super-H)
  • CPPSH.EXE preprocessor (C PreProcessor Super-H)

CCSH calls CPPSH with the source file first to get a raw code file to compile, and then actually compiles it. Here, we can see by running CPPSH alone that it still triggers the error, which means the problem effectively comes from CPPSH. After a thorough analysis in Ida, it seems that even though the code that handles parsing the command-line parameters related to include directories, those paths aren't actually added to the program's internal directory array and thus never actually

Paella, or how to emulate PSX games in Windows CE userland

Lately, I've been decompiling Tomb Raider 5 with some friends and while researching potential sources of debug informations that could help the process, I stumbled upon the Pocket PC version of Tomb Raider 1. It was ported by Ideaworks3D, a London-based game development company specialized in porting.

It's supposed to run on low-performance handheld devices running Windows Mobile/CE 5.0 and thus one would imagine that they have simply taken the Windows code and tweaked it a little bit to make it run on CE. Well as I discovered, it's more complicated than that. First, there is no Windows version of TR1, it was only released for DOS and was never ported to either Win16 or Win32. Second, they actually didn't take the PC version as a base, but the PSX version.

It may seem weird, why take the PSX version if your product is going to run on Windows CE. As it appears, Ideaworks3D seems to have developed an in-house userland syscall JIT translator for PSX, and uses it when porting games to CE. In other words, they compile the PSX codebase to ARM code and link that binary against a DLL file called iepaella.dll which contains

PyQt, or how to break Unicode in 2018

For my latest project (Turing), I chose to use PyQt 5 for the GUI because it's what seemed the best to me to allow the whole thing to be cross-platform without much of a hassle. It has done its job quite well for about everything.

After some months of development though, I ran into an issue I was unable to fix : there is a bug, somewhere inbetween pylupdate5 (that scans code files for lines to translate) and lrelease (that compiles .ts files to .qm files) which basically prevents using non-ASCII characters in source strings. You can use them in translated strings, but not in the code files.

Quite strange, since both the code files and the .ts files (which are in XML format) are encoded in UTF-8. Or so I thought.

It seems that lrelease assumes that everything is ASCII (well, to be precise, Latin-1) if you don't specify it at each <message> element in the file, even though the very first line of the file (the XML header) specifies the encoding, in this case utf-8. pylupdate5 has no problem with that and assumes UTF-8 by default.

The workaround is to add an attribute to each <message&